Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/19175
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dc.contributor.authorMorrow, Anita-
dc.contributor.authorOrr, Neil-
dc.contributor.authorNash, Kai-
dc.contributor.authorCoates, Harvey-
dc.contributor.authorCross, Cara-
dc.contributor.authorEvans, John Robert-
dc.contributor.authorGunasekera, Hasantha-
dc.contributor.authorHarkus, Samantha-
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Linda-
dc.contributor.authorMcLeod, Sharynne-
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Catherine-
dc.contributor.authorNeal, Katie-
dc.contributor.authorSalins, Andrea-
dc.contributor.authorMacniven, Rona-
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-28T22:48:01Z-
dc.date.available2023-06-28T22:48:01Z-
dc.date.issued2023-01-14-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10620/19175-
dc.description.abstractHealth and well-being are holistic concepts that are perceived to be inseparable for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. We examined relationships between parent-reported ear symptoms for 787 Indigenous children at two time points (age 2-3 years, age 4-5 years) and two parent-reported speech and language outcomes one year later (age 5-6 years). Most parents (80.2%) reported no concern about their child's expressive language and (93.8%) receptive language. Binary logistic regression models examined ear health as a predictor of children's expressive and receptive speech and language adjusting for sociodemographic and health covariates. For children without parent-reported ear symptoms, there were lower odds of parental concern about expressive speech and language (aOR = 0.45; 95% CI 0.21-0.99) and receptive language (aOR = 0.24; 95% CI 0.09-0.62). Parents were less likely to have concerns about the child's expressive speech and language if their child was female, lived in urban or regional areas, had excellent or very good global health, or had no disability when aged 2-5 years. Since parent-reported ear health and speech and language concerns were related, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children could benefit from culturally safe, strength-based, and family-centered integrated speech, language, and ear health services.en
dc.subjectAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-
dc.subjectchild-
dc.subjectcohort studies-
dc.subjectcommunication-
dc.subjecthearing-
dc.subjectindigenous-
dc.subjectlanguage-
dc.subjectparents-
dc.subjectpreschool-
dc.subjectspeech-
dc.titleParent Perspectives of Ear Health and the Relationship with Children's Speech and Language in the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Childrenen
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/children10010165en
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/2227-9067/10/1/165en
dc.identifier.surveyLSICen
dc.identifier.volume10en
dc.identifier.issue1 - Special Issue Cognitive and Linguistic Development in Children and Adolescentsen
dc.title.bookChildrenen
dc.subject.dssCulture and languageen
dc.subject.dssHealth and wellbeingen
dc.relation.surveyLSICen
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Articles-
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles
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