Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/18539
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dc.contributor.authorColliver, Yeshe-
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Linda J.-
dc.contributor.authorHumburg, Peter-
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Jude-
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-20T20:58:27Z-
dc.date.available2022-02-20T20:58:27Z-
dc.date.issued2021-12-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10620/18539-
dc.description.abstractSelf-regulation skills are foundational to successful participation in society, and predict a suite of positive outcomes throughout life. It has long been asserted that free (i.e., unstructured) play is important for the development of self-regulation, but studies investigating play and self-regulation have faced empirical limitations. The current study used a large sample (n = 2213) from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children to investigate time spent in unstructured quiet and active play activities at ages 2–3 and 4–5 years as a predictor of self-regulation abilities 2 years later. Children's play was reported by parents who completed a 24-hour time-use diary for 1 random weekend day and 1 weekday. Self-regulation was indexed at ages 4–5 and 6–7 by parent-, teacher- and observer-reported items comparable to similar large, longitudinal studies. Results showed that the more time children spent in unstructured quiet play Self-regulation skills are foundational to successful participation in society, and predict a suite of positive outcomes throughout life. It has long been asserted that free (i.e., unstructured) play is important for the development of self-regulation, but studies investigating play and self-regulation have faced empirical limitations. The current study used a large sample (n = 2213) from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children to investigate time spent in unstructured quiet and active play in the toddler and preschool years, the better their self-regulation abilities at ages 4–5 and 6–7 years, even after controlling for earlier self-regulation abilities and other known predictors. Further, between 1 and 5 hours of preschoolers’ unstructured active play time significantly predicted self-regulation 2 years later. This study provides early support for parenting programs designed to increase opportunities for children to spend time in unstructured, free play in the early years.en
dc.titleDoes toddlers' and preschoolers' play predict later self-regulation? Longitudinal evidence from a representative Australian sampleen
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2021.11.011en
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0885200621001411en
local.contributor.institutionMacquarie Universityen
local.contributor.institutionMacquarie Universityen
local.contributor.institutionMacquarie Universityen
local.contributor.institutionUniversity of New South Walesen
dc.identifier.surveyLSACen
dc.description.keywordsYoung children's playen
dc.description.keywordsSelf-regulationen
dc.description.keywordsTime-Use Diaryen
dc.identifier.refereedyesen
dc.identifier.volume59en
dc.description.pages148-161en
dc.identifier.issue2en
local.profile.orcid0000-0002-5481-3280en
local.profile.orcid0000-0003-3835-6283en
local.profile.orcid0000-0002-3331-6496en
dc.description.additionalinfoOpen accessen
local.identifier.emailyeshe.colliver@mq.edu.auen
local.identifier.emaillinda.j.harrion@mq.edu.auen
local.identifier.emailp.humburg@unsw.edu.auen
dc.title.bookEarly Childhood Research Quarterlyen
dc.subject.dssChildhood and child developmenten
dc.relation.surveyLSACen
item.openairetypeJournal Articles-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
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