Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/18195
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dc.contributor.authorGoldfeld, Sharon-
dc.contributor.authorIncledon, E-
dc.contributor.authorKvalsvig, A-
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Meredith-
dc.contributor.authorMensah, F-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-13T03:41:58Zen
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-15T05:43:27Zen
dc.date.available2018-08-15T05:43:27Zen
dc.date.issued2014-01-09-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10620/18195en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10620/4439en
dc.description.abstractBackground The child mental health epidemiology literature focuses almost exclusively on reporting the prevalence and predictors of child mental disorders. However, there is growing recognition of positive mental health or mental health competence as an independent outcome that cannot be inferred from the absence of problems, and requires epidemiological investigation in its own right. Methods We developed a novel measure of child mental health competence within the framework of the Australian Early Development Index, a three-yearly national census of early child development. Predictors of this outcome were investigated by linking these census data at individual level to detailed background information collected by a large longitudinal cohort study. Results Predictors of competence were consistent with previously described theoretical and empirical models. Overall, boys were significantly less likely than girls to demonstrate a high level of competence (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.91). Other strong predictors of competence were parent education and a relative absence of maternal psychological distress; these factors also appeared to attenuate the negative effect of family hardship on child competence. Conclusions This measure of mental health competence shows promise as a population-level indicator with the potential benefit of informing and evaluating evidence-based public health intervention strategies that promote positive mental health.en
dc.subjectChild Developmenten
dc.subjectHealth -- Mentalen
dc.titlePredictors of mental health competence in a population cohort of Australian children.en
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech-2013-203007en
dc.identifier.urlhttps://jech.bmj.com/content/68/5/431.shorten
dc.identifier.surveyLSACen
dc.description.keywordsPositive mental healthen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen
dc.identifier.volume68en
dc.description.pages431-437en
dc.identifier.issue5en
local.identifier.id5008en
dc.title.bookJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen
dc.subject.dssChildhood and child developmenten
dc.subject.dssHealth and wellbeingen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryHealthen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryChild Developmenten
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryMentalen
dc.subject.flosseHealth and wellbeingen
dc.subject.flosseChildhood and child developmenten
dc.relation.surveyLSACen
dc.old.surveyvalueLSACen
item.openairetypeJournal Articles-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
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