Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/17848
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dc.contributor.authorPhillips, R-
dc.contributor.authorHogan, A-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-13T03:38:48Zen
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-07T23:04:27Zen
dc.date.available2014-09-07T23:04:27Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08-12-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10620/17848en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10620/4055en
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To explore the association between participation and social competence for preschool aged children with and without disabilities. Methods: The sample was drawn from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (n = 4983) which included children aged 4–5 years reported to have hearing problems (n = 164), vision problems (n = 146) and other physical disabilities (n = 114). Chi-square, correlation and logistic regression analyses were used to describe the participation and social competence of children with and without these conditions, as well as examine the association between these constructs. Results: Children with disabilities had similar levels of participation but lower social competence than children without these disabilities. Further analyses revealed a small negative correlation between the two variables (ranging from −0.120 to −0.300 for the three groups) and that children who have low participation are more likely to have abnormal levels of social competence than children with higher participation. Conclusions: The association between participation and social competence may not be as strong for this age group as anticipated in the literature, additional factors may be influential. Examination of the social competence scores identified two factors which may assist in explaining the variance in scores: (1) the experience of disability and (2) the quality of interactions. Implications for Rehabilitation •Children with disabilities who participate in similar activities to their typically developing peers may not necessarily develop commensurate levels of social competence. •As well as focusing on increasing the participation of children in activities other factors that may have a stronger influence on social competence should be considered, such as supporting (1) the social experience of disability and (2) the quality of interactions that children with disabilities experience.en
dc.subjectChildren -- Disableden
dc.subjectChildren -- Preschoolen
dc.subjectChild Development -- Socialen
dc.titleRecreational participation and the development of social competence in preschool aged children with disabilities: a cross-sectional studyen
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09638288.2014.949355en
dc.identifier.surveyLSACen
dc.description.keywordsHearing lossen
dc.description.keywordsParticipationen
dc.description.keywordsSocial competenceen
dc.description.keywordsSocial inclusionen
dc.description.keywordsYoung childrenen
dc.identifier.journalDisability and Rehabilitationen
dc.identifier.volume37en
dc.identifier.issue11en
local.identifier.id4539en
dc.title.bookDisability and Rehabilitationen
dc.subject.dssChildhood and child developmenten
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryChild Developmenten
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryChildrenen
dc.subject.dsssubcategorySocialen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryPreschoolen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryDisableden
dc.subject.flosseChildhood and child developmenten
dc.relation.surveyLSACen
dc.old.surveyvalueLSACen
item.openairetypeJournal Articles-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles
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