Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/17415
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHardy, Pen
dc.contributor.authorPatton, G.C.en
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, J.W.en
dc.contributor.authorWaters, E.B.en
dc.contributor.authorPatton, Gen
dc.contributor.authorWaters, Een
dc.contributor.authorWake, Men
dc.contributor.authorCanterford, Len
dc.contributor.authorHasketh, K.D.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-13T03:35:03Zen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-19T04:17:49Zen
dc.date.available2012-01-19T04:17:49Zen
dc.date.issued2011-06en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10620/17415en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10620/3518en
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To determine longitudinal relationships between body mass index (BMI) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in an adolescent population sample. Design. Data collected in 2000 and 2005 within the Health of Young Victorians longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: Originally a community sample of elementary school students in Victoria, Australia. Follow-up occurred in either secondary schools or individuals homes. PARTICIPANTS: Cohort recruited in 1997 via a random sampling design from Victorian elementary schools. Originally comprising 1 943 children, 1 569 (80.8%) participated in 2000 (wave 2, 8-13 years) and 851 (54%) in 2005 (wave 3, 13-19 years). Main outcome measures. In both waves participants and their parents completed the PedsQL, a 23-item child HRQoL measure, and BMI z-scores and status (non-overweight, overweight or obese) were calculated from measured height and weight. Associations were tested cross-sectionally and longitudinally (linear regression, adjusted for baseline values) RESULTS: A total of 81.6% remained in the same BMI category, while 11.4% and 7.0% moved to higher and lower categories, respectively. Cross-sectional inverse associations between lower PedsQL and higher BMI categories were similar to those for elementary school children. Wave 2 BMI strongly predicted wave 3 BMI and wave 2 PedsQL strongly predicted wave 3 PedsQL. Only parent-reported Total PedsQL score predicted higher subsequent BMI, though this effect was small. Wave 2 BMI did not predict wave 3 PedsQL. CONCLUSIONS: This novel study confirmed previous cross-sectional associations, but did not provide convincing evidence that BMI is causally associated with falling HRQoL or vice versa across the transition from childhood to adolescence.en
dc.subjectFamilies -- Adolescents and Youthen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth -- Body size, BMI, Body imageen
dc.titleChanges in body mass index and health related quality of life from childhood to adolescenceen
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21198354en
dc.identifier.surveyLSACen
dc.identifier.rishttp://flosse.dss.gov.au//ris.php?id=3813en
dc.description.keywordsPEDSQL(TM)-4.0en
dc.description.keywordsAustralian preschoolersen
dc.description.keywordsConsequencesen
dc.description.keywordsReliabilityen
dc.description.keywordsOverweighten
dc.description.keywordsWorldwideen
dc.description.keywordsValidityen
dc.description.keywordsObese childrenen
dc.description.keywordsYoung adulthooden
dc.description.keywordsSocioeconomic statusen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Pediatric Obesityen
dc.identifier.volume6en
dc.description.pages7en
dc.identifier.issue2-2en
dc.identifier.issue2-Feben
local.identifier.id3813en
dc.subject.dssFamilies and relationshipsen
dc.subject.dssHealth and wellbeingen
dc.subject.dssAdolescents and youthen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryHealthen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryFamiliesen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryBody size, BMI, Body imageen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryAdolescents and Youthen
dc.subject.flosseFamilies and relationshipsen
dc.subject.flosseAdolescents and youthen
dc.subject.flosseHealth and wellbeingen
dc.relation.surveyLSACen
dc.old.surveyvalueLSACen
item.openairetypeJournal Articles-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

1,550
checked on Mar 5, 2024
Google icon

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.