Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/18025
Longitudinal Study: LSAC
Title: Fathers at work: Work-family conflict, work-family enrichment and parenting in an Australian cohort
Authors: Cooklin, A R 
Martin, A 
Strazdins, L 
Nicholson, J 
Westrupp, E 
Giallo, R 
Publication Date: 4-Feb-2014
Pages: 1611-1635
Keywords: Parenting
Work/Family Conflict
Employment
Fatherhood
Abstract: Contemporary fathering is characterised by the combined responsibilities of earning an income and being an involved, nurturing parent. The ensuing work-family interface is likely to affect fathering behaviours. However, the relationship between work-family conflict, work-family enrichment and specific fathering behaviours known to determine children's development has not been widely investigated. Secondary data from fathers of 4-5 year old children (K-cohort, Wave 1) participating in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) were analysed (N=2679). Results revealed that higher work-family conflict was associated with more irritable (β = 0.06, p<0.001), less warm (β = -0.04, p<0.01), and less consistent parenting (β = -0.07, p<0.001), when socio-demographic and child characteristics were controlled for. Protective associations were found between work-family enrichment and optimal parenting behaviours. Fathers' employed for long hours, and those who were the sole-earner in the household were most at risk of reporting high work-family conflict. Findings provide impetus for workplace and public policy to extend optimal, family-friendly employment conditions to all parents, including fathers, of young children.
DOI: 10.1177/0192513X14553054
URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0192513X14553054
Keywords: Employment -- Work/life Balance; Employment -- Labour force participation; Families -- Fathers; Families -- Parents and Parenting
Research collection: Journal Articles
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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