Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/17908
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Margaret Sen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Kateen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Kate Een
dc.contributor.authorBroughton, Maryen
dc.contributor.authorAbad, Vickyen
dc.contributor.authorWelch, Graham Fen
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-13T03:39:22Zen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-10T21:02:09Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-10T21:02:09Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10620/17908en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10620/4087en
dc.description.abstractThe benefits of early shared book reading between parents and children have long been established,yet the same cannot be said for early shared music activities in the home. This study investigated the parent–child home music activities in a sample of 3031 Australian children participating in Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) study. Frequency of shared home music activities was reported by parents when children were 2–3 years and a range of social, emotional,and cognitive outcomes were measured by parent and teacher report and direct testing two years later when children were 4–5 years old. A series of regression analyses (controlling for a set of important socio-demographic variables) found frequency of shared home music activities to have a small significant partial association with measures of children’s vocabulary, numeracy, attentional and emotional regulation, and prosocial skills. We then included both book reading and shared home music activities in the same models and found that frequency of shared home music activities maintained small partial associations with measures of prosocial skills, attentional regulation, and numeracy. Our findings suggest there may be a role for parent-child home music activities in supporting children’s development.en
dc.subjectChildren -- Early childhooden
dc.subjectActivities -- Children's activitiesen
dc.subjectChild Developmenten
dc.titleAssociations between early shared music activities int he home and later child outcomes: Findings from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Childrenen
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0885200615000058en
dc.identifier.surveyLSACen
dc.description.keywordsmusicen
dc.description.keywordsearly childhooden
dc.description.keywordsdevelopmenten
dc.identifier.journalEarly Childhood Research Quarterlyen
dc.identifier.volume31en
dc.description.pages113-124en
local.identifier.id4578en
dc.subject.dssChildhood and child developmenten
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryActivitiesen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryChild Developmenten
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryChildrenen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryChildren's activitiesen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryEarly childhooden
dc.subject.flosseChildhood and child developmenten
dc.relation.surveyLSACen
dc.old.surveyvalueLSACen
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Articles-
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

264
checked on Apr 15, 2024
Google icon

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.