Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/17809
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dc.contributor.authorWatson, Ien
dc.contributor.authorDobbie, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorMacMillan, Craigen
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Ianen
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-13T03:38:27Zen
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-23T22:19:39Zen
dc.date.available2014-03-23T22:19:39Zen
dc.date.issued2014-03-14en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10620/17809en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10620/3907en
dc.description.abstractThis article uses Australian panel data for the years 2001–2009 to estimate returns to general experience, job and occupational tenure.We pay particular attention to issues of unobserved heterogeneity bias in our estimations. We find that both general experience and occupational tenure have statistically and numerically significant effects on wage outcomes, even after controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. Job tenure on the other hand only seems to matter in OLS regressions that do not control for heterogeneity biases. Once these biases are controlled for, only a modest effect from job tenure remains. The inclusion of occupational tenure in the estimating equation tends to negate even this modest job tenure effect. The only exception to this is for workers in large organizations. For these workers a small but statistically significant effect from job tenure remains, even once we have controlled for heterogeneity and included occupational tenure in the estimating equation. The results reported in this article have implications for the various theories of the labour market that predict upward-sloping wage-job tenure profiles.en
dc.subjectHuman Capital -- Labouren
dc.subjectIncome & Finance -- Income (Salary and Wages)en
dc.subjectHuman Capitalen
dc.subjectEmployment -- Labour marketsen
dc.titleThe returns to general experience, job and occupational tenure: a study using Australian panel dataen
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00036846.2014.894632#.UyeOf3f4KSoen
dc.identifier.surveyHILDAen
dc.description.keywordslabour market experienceen
dc.description.keywordspanel dataen
dc.description.keywordshuman capitalen
dc.description.keywordsearningsen
dc.identifier.journalApplied Economicsen
dc.identifier.volume46en
dc.description.pages2096-2107en
dc.identifier.issue18en
local.identifier.id4371en
dc.subject.dssLabour marketen
dc.subject.dssIncome, wealth and financesen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryEmploymenten
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryIncome & Financeen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryHuman Capitalen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryIncome (Salary and Wages)en
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryLabouren
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryLabour marketsen
dc.subject.flosseIncome, wealth and financesen
dc.subject.flosseEmployment and unemploymenten
dc.relation.surveyHILDAen
dc.old.surveyvalueHILDAen
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Articles-
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles
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