Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/17468
Longitudinal Study: LSAC
Title: Preventing and treating childhood obesity: time to target fathers
Authors: Morgan, P 
Freeman, E 
Burrows, T 
Callister, R 
Collins, C 
Fletcher, R 
Publication Date: Jan-2012
Pages: 12-15
Keywords: obesity prevention
childhood obesity
father weight status
parent intervention
mother weight status
Abstract: Objective:To examine the long-term effects of having one overweight or obese parent on child weight status and determine whether these effects vary according to parent sex.Design:Prospective study: Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC).Subjects:Two-parent families (N=3285) from the LSAC were included if height and weight data were available for both parents and their child at the 2004 and 2008 time points.Measurements:Child weight status category (healthy, overweight, obese) in 2008 when the child was aged 8-9 years. Regression modelling was used to investigate how self-reported parent weight status in 2004 influenced measured child weight status 4 years later.Results:Parent body mass index (BMI) was significantly correlated with child BMI, but there was no evidence of sex-specific associations between parent and child BMI correlations. The results from the regression analysis showed that having an overweight or obese father, but a healthy weight mother, significantly increased the odds of child obesity (odds ratio: 4.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01-17.33 and odds ratio: 14.88, 95% CI: 2.61-84.77, respectively), but the reverse scenario (overweight or obese mother with a healthy weight father) was not a significant predictor of child overweight or obesity (odds ratio: 2.52, 95% CI: 0.38-16.71 and odds ratio: 2.56, 95% CI: 0.31-21.26, respectively).Conclusions:Children with overweight or obese fathers are at a higher risk of becoming obese. This suggests that interventions are urgently required to test the efficacy of treating overweight fathers as a key strategy for childhood obesity prevention and/or treatment.
DOI: 10.1038/ijo.2011.198
URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22005717/
Keywords: Child Development -- Physical; Health -- Body size, BMI, Body image; Families -- Fathers
Research collection: Journal Articles
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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