Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/17386
Longitudinal Study: LSIC
Title: A study of Indigenous children’s developmental outcomes: the impact of child, family and socio-economic characteristics
Authors: Redmond, G 
Mullan, K 
Publication Date: 30-Nov-2011
Keywords: Development
Children
Indigenous
Abstract: Closing the gap in early child development between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children is a core aim of Federal, State and Territory Governments. Addressing this aim raises a complex set of issues and yet, all too often, Indigenous people and families are simply regarded as a single unitary group. This is unfortunate, as efforts to close the gap stand a much better chance of success if they are based on a more nuanced understanding of the relationship between disadvantage and child development within Indigenous communities. This paper offers a small step towards a better understanding of the relationship between child development outcomes and characteristics associated with the child, family, the broader environment and socio-economic conditions. Using data from the first wave of the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children we present a detailed picture of the characteristics of Indigenous children, their primary carers, their environment, and aspects of the socio-economic conditions within which they develop. Focusing on Indigenous children 3-6 years old, we look at associations between these characteristics and outcomes relating to children’s readiness to learn, their early language development, and their socio-emotional development. Our results show a complex set of relationships and we discuss implications for policy development and future research.
Conference: Australian Social Policy Conference
Conference location: Sydney
Keywords: Child Development
Research collection: Conference Presentations
Appears in Collections:Conference Presentations

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