Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/17374
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dc.contributor.authorBittman, M-
dc.contributor.authorBrown, J-
dc.contributor.authorSkouteris, H-
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, L-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-13T03:34:43Zen
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-28T04:17:46Zen
dc.date.available2011-11-28T04:17:46Zen
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10620/17374en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10620/3488en
dc.description.abstractThe impact of children’s individual lifestyle behaviours on obesity is well known. As the family is the primary social force shaping children’s lives, many of the risk factors for overweight and obesity in early childhood are likely to have roots within the family context. Based on their attitudes and beliefs, parents set and enforce rules and create a home environment that necessarily influences their children’s participation in sedentary behaviours like television viewing or computer use, exercise and eating behaviours. Data from the first three waves of the K cohort (LSAC) data was used to investigate whether proximal and distal parental practices at Wave 1 and 2 (child aged 4/5 & 6/7) were associated with children’s media use, and whether these lifestyle behaviours at Wave 2 (child aged 6/7) were associated with child weight status at Wave 3 (child aged 8/9). Results from the path model revealed that consistent parenting (Wave 1) was associated with other parenting practices and some of the children’s media use and lifestyle behaviours at Wave 2. Further the model revealed that although children’s television watching was associated with more snacking and less moderate to vigorous activity, only time spent in television viewing was significantly associated with child weight status at age 8/9 years. The analyses revealed a clear pathway linking consistent parenting with parental practices regarding television viewing, with the time children spent watching television and child weight status.en
dc.subjectActivities -- Children's activitiesen
dc.subjectHealth -- Physical activityen
dc.subjectChild Development -- Physicalen
dc.titleParenting practices, children's media use and childhood obesityen
dc.typeConference Presentationsen
dc.identifier.urlhttps://growingupinaustralia.gov.au/research-findings/lsac-research-conferences/lsac-and-lsic-research-conference-2011en
dc.identifier.surveyLSACen
dc.identifier.rishttp://flosse.dss.gov.au//ris.php?id=3779en
dc.description.keywordstime-use dataen
dc.description.keywordsChildhood obesityen
dc.description.keywordsparenting practicesen
dc.description.keywordsmedia useen
dc.description.conferencelocationMelbourne, Australiaen
dc.description.conferencenameGrowing Up in Australia and Footprints in Time: The LSAC and LSIC Research Conferenceen
dc.identifier.refereedYesen
local.identifier.id3779en
dc.description.formatPresentationen
dc.date.conferencestart2011-11-15-
dc.date.conferencefinish2011-11-16-
dc.date.presentation2011-11-
dc.subject.dssChildhood and child developmenten
dc.subject.dssHealth and wellbeingen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryActivitiesen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryChild Developmenten
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryHealthen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryPhysicalen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryPhysical activityen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryChildren's activitiesen
dc.subject.flosseChildhood and child developmenten
dc.subject.flosseHealth and wellbeingen
dc.relation.surveyLSACen
dc.old.surveyvalueLSACen
item.openairetypeConference Presentations-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
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