Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/17344
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dc.contributor.authorChesters, Jenny-
dc.contributor.authorBaxter, Janeen-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-13T03:34:27Zen
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-21T02:25:32Zen
dc.date.available2011-10-21T02:25:32Zen
dc.date.issued2011-10-21-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10620/17344en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10620/3476en
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has established that paid care work is typically undertaken by women and that this work is often poorly rewarded in terms of pay and promotion opportunities. Much less is known about the reasons why women enter these jobs or their experiences of this work. This paper examines the motivations and experiences of two groups of careworkers: childcare workers and dental assistants in Queensland in 2009 (N=1767). We examine intrinsic, extrinsic and overall job satisfaction and the effects of job characteristics, work experience and demographic characteristics on job satisfaction. We find that childcare workers are less satisfied with their jobs than dental assistants on all three measures, despite a greater proportion nominating intrinsic reasons for entering the occupation. The most important factors predicting job satisfactions for both groups are day-to-day work experiences such as control over weekly rosters and entitlements that enable work-family balance. We conclude that although love of the job may be a strong drawcard into care occupations for some women, experience may not live up to expectations. Moreover, there is considerable diversity across these groups in motivations and outcomes indicating that it is impossible to view all care occupations as similar in terms of rewards, outcomes and experiences.en
dc.subjectSatisfaction -- Worken
dc.subjectEmployment -- Occupations and careersen
dc.subjectEmployment -- Incentivesen
dc.titlePrisoners of Love? Job Satisfaction in Care Worken
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/j.1839-4655.2011.tb00205.xen
dc.identifier.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/j.1839-4655.2011.tb00205.xen
dc.identifier.surveyHILDAen
dc.identifier.rishttp://flosse.dss.gov.au//ris.php?id=3766en
dc.description.keywordscare worken
dc.description.keywordsJob satisfactionen
dc.description.keywordswork experienceen
dc.identifier.journalAustralian Journal of Social Issuesen
dc.identifier.volume46en
dc.description.pages49-67en
dc.identifier.issue1en
local.identifier.id3766en
dc.description.additionalinfoFor the purpose of comparison with a broader national sample of Australian employees, we also examine data from Wave 9 of the HILDA project collected in 2009.en
dc.title.bookAustralian Journal of Social Issuesen
dc.subject.dssLabour marketen
dc.subject.dssmaincategorySatisfactionen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryEmploymenten
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryWorken
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryIncentivesen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryOccupations and careersen
dc.subject.flosseEmployment and unemploymenten
dc.relation.surveyHILDAen
dc.old.surveyvalueHILDAen
item.openairetypeJournal Articles-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles
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