Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/17332
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dc.contributor.authorHeybroek, Len
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-13T03:34:21Zen
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T01:01:58Zen
dc.date.available2011-10-31T01:01:58Zen
dc.date.issued2011-10-31en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10620/17332en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10620/3484en
dc.description.abstractRetirement is an important life course event, potentially involving major changes to an individual’s economic and social circumstances. This research aims to contribute to a better understanding of how retirement is experienced in Australian society. Latent Growth Mixture Modeling (LGMM) was used to investigate individual trajectories in life satisfaction across the retirement transition. The LGMM approach allows the identification of latent subgroups of people who experience retirement differently and the examination of variations in the characteristics and resources of those groups. The analytical sample is based on the first 9 waves of HILDA and includes 600 people (302 men, 298 women) who made a single transition into retirement and who stay retired. Three groups of respondents experiencing different trajectories of life satisfaction were identified by the models. The first group, by far the largest comprising 88% of respondents, was identified as the ‘maintainers’ and showed relatively high and stable levels of life satisfaction. A second group, comprising 7% of respondents, was identified as the ‘adapters’ and experienced a decline in life satisfaction in the three years leading up to retirement, followed by an increase after retirement. The final group, 5% of respondents, was identified as the ‘decliners’ and showed a steady decline in life satisfaction in the three years after retirement. Covariates were included to model life satisfaction trajectories within and between the three latent groups. The results show that while most people experience very little retirement related change in life satisfaction, there are latent subgroups that experience significant change. These subgroups have been found to have lower levels of health and less access to a range of social and economic resources.en
dc.subjectSatisfaction -- Lifeen
dc.subjectAgeing -- Retirementen
dc.titleLife Satisfaction and Retirement: A Latent Growth Mixture Modelling Approachen
dc.typeConference Papersen
dc.identifier.urlhttp://melbourneinstitute.com/hildaen
dc.identifier.surveyHILDAen
dc.identifier.rishttp://flosse.dss.gov.au//ris.php?id=3774en
dc.description.keywordsRetirementen
dc.description.keywordsLatent Growth Mixture Modelingen
dc.description.keywordsLife Satisfactionen
dc.description.conferencelocationUniversity of Melbourneen
dc.description.conferencenameHILDA Survey 10th Anniversary Research Conference 2011en
dc.identifier.refereedYesen
local.identifier.id3774en
dc.description.formatConference Paper and Presentationen
dc.identifier.emailLachlan Heybroeken
dc.date.conferencestart14/07/2011en
dc.date.conferencestart2011-07-14en
dc.date.conferencefinish2011-07-15en
dc.date.conferencefinish15/07/2011en
dc.date.presentation14/07/2011en
dc.date.presentation2011-07-14en
dc.subject.dssAgeingen
dc.subject.dssmaincategorySatisfactionen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryAgeingen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryRetirementen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryLifeen
dc.subject.flosseAgeingen
dc.relation.surveyHILDAen
dc.old.surveyvalueHILDAen
item.openairetypeConference Papers-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
Appears in Collections:Conference Papers
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