Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10620/16749
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dc.contributor.authorStanton, D-
dc.contributor.authorQu, L-
dc.contributor.authorWeston, R-
dc.contributor.authorGray, M-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-13T03:29:38Zen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-01T09:19:30Zen
dc.date.available2011-04-01T09:19:30Zen
dc.date.issued2004-06-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10620/16749en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10620/3069en
dc.description.abstractThe average hours worked by full-time employees in Australia have increased since the late 1970s. This, combined with increases in female labour force participation, has led to concerns about the impact of long work hours on family life. This paper explores the relationship between fathers' work hours, their own wellbeing and that of their families using data from the HILDA survey. Overall, satisfaction with work hours decreases as the number of hours worked increases beyond the standard working week. However, long hours are not necessarily, or even on average associated with pervasively lower wellbeing. Work hours are negatively related to only two of the thirteen measures of wellbeing examined. For fathers working very long hours, their satisfaction with their work hours is found to be very important to the relationship between work hours and wellbeing.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectEmploymenten
dc.subjectFamilies -- Fathersen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectFamiliesen
dc.subjectEmployment -- Hoursen
dc.subjectHealth -- Wellbeingen
dc.titleLong Work Hours and the Wellbeing of Fathers and their Familiesen
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.identifier.urlhttps://search.informit.org/doi/abs/10.3316/ielapa.072475979217429en
dc.identifier.surveyHILDAen
dc.status.transfertokohaDoneen
dc.identifier.rishttp://flosse.dss.gov.au//ris.php?id=3293en
dc.description.keywordsoccupational choiceen
dc.description.keywordsother particular Labour marketsen
dc.description.keywordsskillsen
dc.description.keywordsPublic Policyen
dc.description.keywordsLabour productivityen
dc.description.keywordsHuman Capitalen
dc.description.keywordsLabor Force and Employmenten
dc.identifier.journalAustralian Journal of Labour Economicsen
dc.identifier.volume7en
dc.description.pages255-273en
dc.identifier.issue2en
local.identifier.id3293en
dc.title.bookAustralian Journal of Labour Economicsen
dc.subject.dssFamilies and relationshipsen
dc.subject.dssHealth and wellbeingen
dc.subject.dssLabour marketen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryHealthen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryFamiliesen
dc.subject.dssmaincategoryEmploymenten
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryWellbeingen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryFathersen
dc.subject.dsssubcategoryHoursen
dc.subject.flosseHealth and wellbeingen
dc.subject.flosseFamilies and relationshipsen
dc.subject.flosseEmployment and unemploymenten
dc.relation.surveyHILDAen
dc.old.surveyvalueHILDAen
item.openairetypeJournal Articles-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
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